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The Cherry Orchard
by Anton Chekhov
version by Pam Gems
from an original translation by Tania Alexander

Wimbledon Studio Theatre

2002

Cast list

Photographs

Reviews

Lopakhin
Matthew Brenher
Dunyasha
Victoria Fradgley
Firs
Kenneth McClellan
Yepichodov
Steve Dineen
Lyubov
Carola Stewart
Anya
Cicely Tennant
Varya
Emma Stratton
Gayev
Roger Sansom
Charlotta
Hilary Burns
Dog
Binkie Beaumont
Pischik
Bryan Hands
Yasha
William Argent
Pyotr
Hugo Cox
Passer-by
Stewart Quentin Holmes
Postmaster
John Barrett
 
Directed by
Bryan Hands
Designed by
Katy Clarke
Costumes by
Didi Chapman
Lighting by
Hannah Kester
Dance direction by
Louise Raphael
Set built by
John Dalton
Poster design by
Alex Dougherty
Stage Manager
Hannah Kester
Deputy Stage Manager
Suzy Hart
Theatre Manager
Jonathan Kennedy
Technician
Tom Matthews

The company would like to thank the following for their assistance with this production: Casarotto Ramsey Associates, Leonie Scott-Matthews of Pentameters Theatre, Andy Lucas, Sara Mason of Allegresse Theatre Company, Andrew Muir, Andy Lucas, and Adam Hawksbee for the loan of Gayev's cane

Croydon Advertiser
13th September 2002
Roger Bing

Carola Stewart plays the owner with no money and little appreciation of her current problems, and Roger Sansom her billiards-loving brother whose penchant for rambling speeches helps him equally to avoid the point.  The harsh new wind blowing through Russia and chilling the fate of the orchard and its estate is neatly demonstrated by Hugo Cox, playing the eternal student who argues with some passion for the new order, and by Matthew Brenher, the businessman who tries with an equal passion to warn the owners of what must happen.  These two make impressive characters, as does Emma Stratton, the always-busy adopted daughter whose hopes for marriage are to be cruelly ignored.  William Argent cuts a figure as the footman ready to seize any big chance he spots, while others involved include Victoria Fradgley as the eager maid who is also destined to disappointment, Cicely Tennant as the young daughter and Steve Dineen as the estate clerk.  The biggest "aah" moment came with the arrival of the governess, Hilary Burns, and her dog, Binkie Beaumont, immaculately behaved throughout.  The old footman is played by Kenneth McClellan who founded the company and found himself at 84 for once playing someone even older: the character is 87. 

 

Indie London (indielondon.co.uk)
April 2003
Paul Nelson

I have seen the play performed with more hilarity, but rarely with so uniformly good a cast.  The fluttery, exasperating Madame Ranyevskaya is delightfully played by Carola Stewart, throwing her almost non-existent money all over the place.  Her grief over both her lost son and lost house and orchard were effectively controlled and played against her empty-headedness.  As her slightly turned brother Gayev (here referred to as Lenya), endlessly potting an imaginary billiard ball into an imaginary hole, and thinking no doubt about an imaginary jackpot on the way, Roger Sansom is excellent.  The lovers, Anya and Pyotr, the former surely one of the current beauties of the English stage, played with charm, fun and pathos by Cicely Tennant, the latter, all spent political idealism and held up in his poverty by his own attractive personality, played by Hugo Cox.  Good strong and satisfying performances were given to the footman and the maid, Yasha (William Argent) and Dunyasha (Victoria Fradgley).  That almost impossible character to play, Charlotta, was expertly seen off by Hilary Burns and excellent work from Steve Dineen and director Bryan Hands gave real life to Yepichodov and Pischik.  All in all an evening to remember,  One last credit that must be given is to the character of Firs the faithful old retainer.  Playing an 87-year-old, the 84-year-old Kenneth McClellan, founder of the company, played what, for me, is the final joke of the play with a delightful twinkle in his eye... Logos has done it again;  long may this excellent company thrive. 

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